Speakers

This is the list of speakers for the conference:

Philip Asherson

Philip Asherson

Philip Asherson, MB,BS, MRCPsych, PhD is Professor of Molecular Psychiatry at the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Research Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London in the United Kingdom.

Prof. Asherson earned his medical degree from The Royal London Hospital and his doctoral degree from the University of Wales. He was an MRC Clinical Research Fellow in the Department of Psychological Medicine & Institute of Medical Genetics at the University of Wales College of Medicine in Cardiff where he worked on molecular genetic studies of schizophrenia with Profs. Mike Owen and Peter McGuffin.

Prof. Asherson works on clinical, quantitative genetic and molecular genetic studies of ADHD in adults and children; and clinical assessment and treatment of adult ADHD.  He has been a senior member of the UK National Adult ADHD Clinic at the Maudsley Hospital since 1998; which was established by Brian Toone and Suzy Young in 1994. He has published several articles on the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adults, with a particular focus on approaches that are relevant to clinical services in the UK. He played a key role in the NICE guidelines for ADHD that were published in autumn 2008, with his main contributions being discussions on the validity of the diagnostic construct of ADHD and providing expert guidance on the clinical procedures and services required for the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adults. Following on from NICE he has worked with a small group of health professionals and support groups to establish the UK Adult ADHD Network, which is professional group that aims to provide ADHD Support, Education and Training; particularly aimed at supporting the establishment of local services and setting a common standard for diagnosis and treatments of adults with ADHD.

Current research projects include the International Multi-centre ADHD Gene (IMAGE) project (IMAGE) that is using a quantitative trait approach to map genes for ADHD. IMAGE has collected over 1,000 families with one or more individuals with combined type ADHD.  He and Jonna Kuntsi work together on family and twin studies that are identifying neuropsychological processes that mediate genetic effects on ADHD. He is the author and co-author of more than 140 articles and book chapters on genetics of psychiatric conditions including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and ADHD, as well as idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE).

President UK Adult ADHD Network

Jan Buitelaar

Jan Buitelaar

Jan Buitelaar is currently professor of psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry at Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, and head of Karakter child and adolescent psychiatry university cluster in Nijmegen. He has a longstanding research interest in neuropsychiatric disorders over the lifespan, including ADHD and autism spectrum disorders, and has been involved in epidemiologic, screening, neuroimaging, psychopharmacologic and genetic studies. He is editor in chief of European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. He has published about 380 peer-reviewed papers and several book chapters.

Pieter-Jan Carpentier

Pieter-Jan Carpentier

Pieter-Jan Carpentier is psychiatrist (medical degree: Antwerp, 1981; certification as psychiatrist: Utrecht, 1988). He is head of the ADHD treatment program for adults at the Reinier van Arkel Group, the mental health institute in ‘s-Hertogenbosch. Between 1998 and 2010 he worked as a consultant psychiatrist at Novadic-Kentron, the addiction treatment centre in the province of Noord-Brabant.

Starting from clinical experience with adult ADHD patients, especially in combination with addiction, he has been active in promoting improved diagnosis and treatment for this patient group, giving lectures and courses on this topic. He is one of the key members of the ADHD Netwerk (founded by J.J. Sandra Kooij and R. Rodrigues Pereira), a Dutch network uniting practitioners in this field.

He participated in writing and implementing a screening and treatment protocol for ADHD in addicted patients (Trimbos Institute, Utrecht, 2000 – 2004). He was principal investigator in the first European controlled study on the use of methylphenidate in patients with ADHD and addiction. Currently he is engaged in a research project on psychiatric comorbidity in opiate-addicted patients in methadone treatment at Novadic-Kentron (scientific committee: Prof. dr. J.K. Buitelaar, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, and Prof. dr. C.A.J. de Jong, Department of Social Sciences, Radboud University, Nijmegen). He participates in ICASA (International Consortium on ADHD and Substance Abuse), an international study group. He is a member of the Guideline Development Group for ADHD in adults of the Dutch Psychiatric Association.

 

David Coghill

David Coghill

David Coghill is a Reader in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Dundee. Dr Coghill is head of the Developmental Research Group within the Department of Psychiatry, University of Dundee. This group has a particular interest in the neuropsychopharmacology of AD/HD and has recently completed a large study into the effects of stimulant medication on neuropsychological functioning in AD/HD.

Dr Coghill's other areas of interest are the interactions between basic and clinical sciences in ADHD and disruptive behaviour disorders, psychopharmacological treatments in child psychiatry and the use of evidence based approaches to care within real world settings. In his clinical practice he is joint clinical lead for the developmental neuropsychiatry team in Tayside and maintains a special interest in forensic child and adolescent psychiatry.

Susan Dunn-Morua

Susan Dunn-Morua

Susan Dunn Morua is the founder of the Bristol Adult ADHD Support Group and is also co-founder and Chairwoman of Adult Attention Deficit Disorder UK (AADD-UK).  The Bristol Support group has over 100 members and has now been been running since 2007.  Susan has worked with a small group of service users  and together they have established AADD-UK as a national advocacy network for adults with ADHD that includes an information website, a forum, phone and email advice and Twitter and Facebook accounts.  Susan’s  efforts have been featured on BBC Radio Bristol, Bristol Community Radio, as well as  Bristol Evening Post, and other newspapers.   Susan, on behalf of AADD-UK, contributed to the NICE guidelines for ADHD that were published in September 2008.  She provided the adult service user perspective.  Susan has given many talks on ADHD to NHS service providers, and other organisations, that have included lifespan themes, service users experiences with obtaining a diagnosis, and service users expectations for adult ADHD services.

Susan has ADHD and dyscalulia.  Pre diagnosis and treatment she had a variety of brief occupations (some were very brief) including, but not limited to, taxi driver, factory hand, and shop assistant.  Post diagnosis and treatment, Susan earned a Bachelor’s (First-class Honours) and a Master’s  degree (inducted into Beta Phi Mu Honour Society) in America.  She then received the professional librarian certificate and worked as a corporate librarian.  Susan is now involved in several projects with AADD-UK.

Barbara Franke

Barbara Franke

Barbara Franke studied Biology in Giessen (Germany) and Utrecht University (The Netherlands). She obtained her PhD from Utrecht University in 1999 for studies on molecular signal transduction. After a postdoc project in Nijmegen, she was appointed head of the Researchlab for Multifactorial Diseases at the Human Genetics department of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Nijmegen, The Netherlands)  in 2001. She started working on the molecular basis of psychiatric disorders in 2004. She currently holds appointments at the departments of Human Genetics and Psychiatry in Nijmegen as an Associate Professor in Molecular Psychiatry. Barbara is a PI at the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior in Nijmegen and was appointed official representative of the Learning, Memory and Plasticity theme of this Institute (http://www.ru.nl/donders/research/theme-3-learning/) per 2011.

Barbara’s research focuses on unraveling the etiology of multifactorial diseases and pharmacogenetics. In this, her main interest is the identification of genetic risk factors for neurodevelopmental (psychiatric) disorders as well as the characterization of the effects of such factors at the molecular, cell and brain level. She has been part of the first genome-wide association studies of ADHD. The work of her group showing that intermediate phenotypes improve power for gene finding in ADHD, and that brain imaging phenotypes in healthy and affected individuals provide a great means for mapping pathways from gene to disease is highly innovative.

In 2007, Barbara set up the International Multicentre persistent ADHD CollaboraTion (IMpACT), which she coordinates since. IMpACT consists of the leading 7 international research groups on adult ADHD and coordinates the largest clinical ADHD sample worldwide (>3000 cases, >4000 controls) for genetic studies. She is also a founder and PI of the Brain Imaging Genetics (BIG) study (>1800 participants) at her institute and a founding member and member of the management team of the new international ENIGMA (http://enigma.loni.ucla.edu/) consortium on brain imaging genetics. In addition, she actively participates in the Psychiatric GWAS consortium and the international ADHD Molecular Genetics Network, as well as being a co-PI of the International Multicentre ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) study on childhood ADHD.

Sandra Kooij

Sandra Kooij

Sandra Kooij is a psychiatrist and involved since 1995 with adult ADHD. In 2006 she received her PhD on ‘ADHD in adults. Clinical studies on Assessment and Treatment’. She has been involved in treating patients, research, training professionals, educating the public, publishing articles, websites, e-newsletters, and 5 books on adult ADHD. The latest book 'Adult ADHD. Diagnostic assessment and treatment' was translated into English in 2010.

In 1998 she started the Dutch ‘Network Adult ADHD’ of professionals, together with patient organisation Balans. In 2010, the Network fused with the pediatricians and child psychiatrist involved in ADHD and is called now the 'ADHD Network'. The ADHD Network has 500 professional members in the Netherlands, treating children and adults with ADHD. In september 2003, she started the coordination of the ‘European Network Adult ADHD’, in which now 20 countries take part. In 2010 she initiated with European Network members the DIVA Foundation, that distributes online and free of charge, translations of the Dutch Diagnostic Interview for ADHD in adults (DIVA 2.0) in 12 languages. The aim of the DIVA Foundation is to lower the threshold for appropriate diagnostic assessment of ADHD in adults.

She is the chair of the Guideline committee on adult ADHD of the Dutch organisation of Psychiatry. Since 2002 she is head of Program and Expertise Center Adult ADHD at PsyQ, psycho-medical programs in The Hague, the Netherlands, where 1200 adults with ADHD and comorbidity are treated by a multidisciplinary team. She is the leader of the Adult ADHD program of PsyQ Netherlands, that has 30 locations in the Netherlands where adults can get treatment according to the same protocol as in the Hague.

Jonna Kuntsi

Jonna Kuntsi

Jonna Kuntsi is Senior Lecturer at the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, UK. She combines cognitive, EEG, fMRI, quantitative genetic (twin and sibling studies) and molecular genetic approaches in her research on ADHD and other disorders. Current research projects include an EEG follow-up study of a large ADHD and control sibling-pair sample that addresses the key developmental question of underlying differences between those individuals who seem to recover from their ADHD during adolescence or early adulthood, and those whose disorder persists. In another new research project Dr Kuntsi and colleagues investigate differences in underlying cognitive and brain processes between women with ADHD and women with bipolar disorder. Prior to her employment at the Institute of Psychiatry, she was based at the Institute of Child Health, University College London, where she carried out one of the first twin studies on cognitive intermediate phenotypes in ADHD, funded by a Wellcome Prize Studentship. Her recent research has been funded by the Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, the British Academy and Action Medical Research. She is Joint Director of the MRC SGDP Centre 1+3 PhD Training Programme. 

Michael B Lensing

Michael B Lensing

Michael B. Lensing is working as a project manager at the Regional Resource Center for Autism, ADHD, Tourette syndrome and Narcolepsy at Oslo University Hospital, Norway.  He is born in Germany and educated as a special educational therapist with an MA in pedagogics. He has been a member of the National Competence Teams for Adult ADHD in Norway and part of the expert group responsible for National guidelines on ADHD. Lensing is involved in several research projects on adult ADHD, which as well is the main topic of his ongoing Phd project. He is a member of the European Adult ADHD Network and is coordinating the National Research Network on Adult ADHD in Norway.

David Nutt

David Nutt

David Nutt is currently the Edmund J Safra Professor of Neuropsychopharmacology and director of the Neuropsychopharmacology Unit in the Division of Experimental Medicine at Imperial College London.

He received his undergraduate training in medicine at Cambridge and Guy's Hospital, and continued training in neurology to MRCP.  After completing his psychiatric training in Oxford, he continued there as a lecturer and then later as a Wellcome Senior Fellow in psychiatry. He then spent two years as Chief of the Section of Clinical Science in the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in NIH, Bethesda, USA. On returning to England in 1988 he set up the Psychopharmacology Unit in Bristol University, an interdisciplinary research grouping spanning the departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology before moving to Imperial College London in December 2008 where he leads a similar group with a particular focus on brain imaging especially PET. 

He is currently Chair of the Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs (ISCD) and President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP), a council member of the European Brain Council, President-elect of the British Neuroscience Association, the UK Director of the European Certificate and Masters in Affective Disorders Courses and a member of the International Centre for Science in Drug Policy. In addition, he has edited the Journal of Psychopharmacology for over a decade and acts as the psychiatry advisor to the British National Formulary. He has published over 400 original research papers, a similar number of reviews and books chapters, eight government reports on drugs and 26 books.

Previously he has been member and Chair of the Advisory Committee on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD – 1998-2009), President of the British Association of Psychopharmacology (BAP), member of the HEFCE/NHS Senior Lecturer Selection Panel and member of the MRC Neuroscience Board.  Other previous national contributions include membership of the Independent Inquiry into the Misuse of Drugs Act (2000 Runciman report), and membership of the Committee on Safety of Medicines (2000 – 2005) and member of the Ministry of Defence Science Advisory Board (2005-2007).  He was the clinical scientific lead on the 2004/5 UK Government Foresight initiative “Brain science, addiction and drugs” that provided a 25-year vision for this area of science and public policy and in 2006 he was Director of Bristol Neuroscience. 

Frederick Reimherr

Frederick Reimherr

Dr. Frederick William Reimherr MD, practices psychiatry in Salt Lake City, Utah where he is Director, of the Psychiatric Research Clinic at Utah University. He was appointed to the American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology in 1984.

Frederick Reimherr has worked with Paul Wender and several other associates at the University of Utah, and published the first paper on the treatment of ADHD in adults in 1976. He assisted with the production of several rating scales for use in adults with ADHD and the Utah Criteria for the diagnosis of ADHD in adults.  Together, they published a number of the first studies assessing the presence and the impact of emotional symptoms in ADHD patients.  In these studies they proposed the subtyping such patients as having ADHD related emotional dysregulation.  They have recently explored the relationship of personality disorder in patients with more severe ADHD, and  examined the impact of Oppositional Defiant Disorder in adult patients.

Frederick has also completed studies in mood disorders, schizophrenia with combined substance abuse, and the use of vagal nerve stimulators for depression.  In addition, to working in research clinic at the University of Utah he worked with his wife in a psychiatric clinic serving patients involved with the city, county, state and federal courts in Utah.  They are jointly working to expand our research efforts in this clinic.

Michael Rosler

Michael Rosler

Michael Rösler is a Professor of Psychiatry, Director of the Institute of Forensic Psychology and Psychiatry and Head of the research unit on adult attention-deficit–hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at the Neurocenter of the Saarland University Hospital (SUH). Previously, he was a Professor of Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Würzburg and Assistant Medical Director of the Institute of Forensic Psychology and Psychiatry of SUH.

Katya Rubia

Katya Rubia

Prof Katya Rubia completed her PhD in Munich, Germany, in 1994, on the neuropsychology of timing functions in brain lesion patients. Since 1995, Prof Rubia has been working at the Child Psychiatry Department, Institute of Psychiatry, London, where she is now Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, Head of the Section of Developmental Neuroimaging. Prof Rubia uses neuropsychology, genetics, pharmacological manipulation and MRI to investigate the neural substrates of cognitive functions associated with attention and impulsiveness in normal development and in abnormal development, in particular Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), but also other related childhood disorders such as conduct disorder (CD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), major depression, preterm birth, schizophrenia and others. Her pharmacological fMRI studies use neurotransmitter and pharmacological manipulations to understand the underlying neurotransmitter abnormalities in ADHD and related disorders. She has published widely on normal developmental, cognitive neuroscience of executive functions, and the neuropsychology and functional brain abnormalities in disorders of child and adult psychiatry. For her research, Prof Rubia has attracted funding from the Wellcome Trust, the Medical Research Council (MRC) and other UK and international funders.

Michael Schlander

Michael Schlander

Michael Schlander is founding chairman of the not-for-profit ‘Institute for Innovation & Valuation in Health Care’ (InnoValHC) in Wiesbaden, Germany (as of 2005).  He is a health economist at the Mannheim Institute of Public Health (MIPH) at the Mannheim Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg (since 2007) and a professor of health care and innovation management at the University of Applied Economic Sciences Ludwigshafen (since 2002).  As of 2006, his institute established a highly respected Health Economics Summer School taking place in Heidelberg, Germany.  He is member of numerous scientific associations, including the International Health Economics Association (iHEA) and the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR); in 2008, he was a co-founder of the German Society for Health Economics (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheits­ökonomie, DGGÖ).

After six years in experimental brain research and clinical neurology, he joined the international pharmaceutical industry in 1987, where he spent 15 years in executive roles in clinical development (1987-1993), marketing (1993-1998), and general management (1998-2002).  Inter alia, he led the one of most successful new product launches ever accomplished by a German pharmaceutical company (a proton pump inhibitor, pantoprazole, as of 1994), and managed the turn-around of a medium-sized German pharmaceutical company, successfully refocusing the enterprise towards a research-based niche strategy – consistently achieving double-digit growth rates (revenues and profits) ever since.

He studied medicine and psychology at the University of Frankfurt and has been licensed as a physician in Germany since 1985.  He received his M.D. (grade summa cum laude) from the University of Frankfurt, Germany, an M.B.A. degree (as valedictorian of the class of 1994) from City University of Seattle, Washington, a diploma in health economics from the Stockholm School of Economics, and the venia legendi (Ph.D. equivalent) for health economics from the University of Heidelberg.  His scientific publications include two monographs, on ‘The Contribution of Health Economics to Market-Oriented Pharmaceutical Research and Development’ (Witten/Herdecke University Press; Witten, Germany: 1998) and on ‘Health Technology Assessments by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)’ in England and Wales (Springer; New York, NY: 2007).

His current projects include health economic evaluation studies, analyses of the economic dimensions of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a comparative study of preference-based health-related quality of life instruments, and the development of a Swiss consensus on the future use of Health Technology Assessments in Switzerland (www.swisshta.ch), which is supported by major stakeholders including santésuisse and Interpharma.

www.michaelschlander.com; www.innoval-hc.com.

Edmund Sonuga-Barke

Edmund Sonuga-Barke

Edmund Sonuga-Barke is the Professor of Developmental Psychopathology and Director of the Developmental Brain and Behaviour Laboratory at the University of Southampton. He has a special interest in the causes of disruptive behaviour problems, especially ADHD. His published work spans epidemiology, genetics, neuroimaging, eletrophysiology, neuropsychology, treatment studies (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) and health outcomes research. He worked along side Michael Rutter as the PI of the English & Romanian Adoptees  (ERA) Study at the Institute of Psychiatry where he has held a visiting Chair in the past. In this capacity he has made special efforts to introduce both genetic and brain imaging studies of the moderators and mediators of the effects of early deprivation. He has an adjunct chair of Child Psychiatry at New York University and a visiting Chair at the University of Gent, in Belgium. He is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry.

Argyris Stringaris

Argyris Stringaris

Dr Argyris Stringaris, MD, PhD, MRCPsych is a Wellcome Trust Intermediate Clinical Fellow, Lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London,  and a Child Psychiatrist at the Maudsley Hospital. He uses genetic, epidemiologic, neuroimaging, and clinic-based study designs to study mood and its regulation across development. His main aim is to understand the mechanisms by which some people are more irritable or more depressed than others and how sudden changes in mood affect the wellbeing of people. His studies have also contributed to the debate about bipolar disorder in children and adolescents.

Eric Taylor

Eric Taylor

Eric Taylor is Emeritus Professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at King’s College London Institute of Psychiatry; and an honorary consultant at 'The Maudsley'.  He has researched, practised clinically, and taught child neuropsychiatry  since 1971.  His special interests have been in the causes, course and treatment of ADHD, and the research has included longitudinal epidemiology, nosological distinctions within the ADHD spectrum, neuropsychology and neuroimaging, molecular genetics and treatment trials. He chaired the NICE guidelines development group for ADHD; and is also a Trustee of the National Academy of Parenting Practitioners and a Non-Executive Director of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. His research won the Ruane Prize from NARSAD for severe child psychopathologies and he is a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences. Publications include more than 200 scientific papers, many chapters and editorials, and several books.

Geurt van de Glind

Geurt van de Glind

Geurt van de Glind worked for over thirteen years at a Netherlands Addiction Treatment Center, after graduating for Mental Health Nurse. In that period he studied Health Sciences and with his masters degree in 2000 he started working for the Trimbos-institute, Netherlands institute on mental health and addiction. He worked on development of Practice Guidelines for mental health and addiction issues and he was involved in the development of a protocol for diagnoses and treatment of ADHD in Substance Use Disorder patients. Since that project, ending in 2004, he worked on developing an international network of researchers targeting the topic of ADHD and Substance abuse. This resulted in founding the International Collaboration on ADHD and Substance Abuse (ICASA) in 2010, an international foundation by Netherlands law, of which he is the first director.

Margaret Weiss

Margaret Weiss

Margaret D. Weiss, MD, PhD, FRCP(C), is the head of a provincial program for ADHD that serves as a centre of excellence for clinical treatment, teaching and research in ADHD in the province of British Columbia.  She received her MD and Fellowship in Psychiatry from  McGill University and her PhD in the History of Science from Harvard University.  Dr. Weiss has specialized in all aspects of ADHD through the life cycle and published peer-reviewed articles relating to these topics in several major medical journals as the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry and Pediatrics. . The author of two book chapters on ADHD, Dr. Weiss also coauthored the book ADHD in Adulthood: A Guide to Current Theory, Diagnosis, and Treatment.  Dr. Weiss is best known for her research demonstrating that melatonin is a safe and effective treatment for initial insomnia in ADHD, her work on medication development, the  Weiss Functional Impairment Scale, and her recent studies of quality of life and functional impairment as important outcomes. As a full time clinician, she has made the agenda of her research the translation of clinical practice into evidence based care.

The travel arrangements for Margaret Weiss have been sponsored by Janssen.


Susan Young

Susan Young

Susan Young, BSc (Hons), DClinPsy, PhD is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in Forensic Clinical Psychology in the Department of Forensic Mental Health Science at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London.  She is Programme Leader of the MSc. in Clinical Forensic Psychology at King’s College London Institute of Psychiatry and an Honorary Consultant Clinical and Forensic Psychologist at the high secure Broadmoor Hospital.  Susan has extensive clinical experience in the assessment and treatment of youths and adults with ADHD and in the assessment and treatment of offenders with mental illness and/or mental disorder.  Previously, she was employed as a Clinical Neuropsychologist at the Maudsley Hospital, where she set up and developed the neuropsychology service at the first adult ADHD service in the United Kingdom.  Susan is author or co-author of over 80 articles and book chapters, and two books.  She has recent publications on psychological treatment and clinical management of ADHD.  Susan was a member of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) ADHD Clinical Guideline Development Group (2008) and participated in the British Association of Psychopharmacology Consensus Meeting (2007) to develop guidelines for management of transition for ADHD adolescents to adult services.  She has acted as a consultant regarding ADHD service development in the UK, Iceland and the Republic of Ireland, in addition to consulting on UK and European ADHD Advisory Boards sponsored by industry. 

Vice President UK Adult ADHD Network